Life Is Not a Song

I hate blogging… and yet I need to clear off all that miscellaneous shit that's piled up in my head.

18, animation student in Vancouver, Canada

stripesdontmakeyoustraight:

If you ever think you did something embarrassing just remember that I had a really hot waiter one time and i was gonna order double pepperoni pizza but I looked him dead in the eye and accidentally asked for double penetration pizza in front of my whole family

tooombz:

Felix Gonzalez-TorresUntitled (Perfect Lovers) 1991. Clocks, paint on wall.
Untitled (Perfect Lovers) consists of two clocks, which start in synchronisation, and slowly, inevitably fall out of time due to the failure of the batteries and the nature of the mechanism. In a moving comment on his personal experiences, the piece refers to Gonzalez-Torres’ HIV positive partner Ross Laycock, and his slow decline and inevitable death due to AIDS. The clocks act as two mechanical heartbeats; representative of two lives destined to fall out of sync, and holds a poignant poetry about personal loss and the temporal nature of life.
“Don’t be afraid of the clocks, they are our time, time has been so generous to us…We conquered fate by meeting at a certain time in a certain space…we are synchronized, now forever. I love you.”

tooombz:

Felix Gonzalez-Torres
Untitled (Perfect Lovers) 1991. Clocks, paint on wall.

Untitled (Perfect Lovers) consists of two clocks, which start in synchronisation, and slowly, inevitably fall out of time due to the failure of the batteries and the nature of the mechanism. In a moving comment on his personal experiences, the piece refers to Gonzalez-Torres’ HIV positive partner Ross Laycock, and his slow decline and inevitable death due to AIDS. The clocks act as two mechanical heartbeats; representative of two lives destined to fall out of sync, and holds a poignant poetry about personal loss and the temporal nature of life.

Don’t be afraid of the clocks, they are our time, time has been so generous to us…We conquered fate by meeting at a certain time in a certain space…we are synchronized, now forever. I love you.”

(Source: moma.org, via avobabe)

onezia:

"Art enables us to find ourselves and lose ourselves at the same time."

onezia:

"Art enables us to find ourselves and lose ourselves at the same time."

pinmeupagainstthesky:

These, for me, are the two most depressing paintings in western history. They were painted by post-impressionist Henry de Toulouse-Lautrec, a man who, due to inbreeding, was born with a genetic disorder that prevented his legs from growing after they were broken. After being so thoroughly mocked for is appearance, he became an alcoholic, which is what eventually caused his institutionalization and death. His only known romantic relations were with prostitutes.

And then he paints something like this which is so beautiful and tender and sentimental. It seems like the couple in bed really loves each other—cares about each other. Wakes up happy to look at each other. And I see that love and passion and I wonder how lonely he must have been. I wonder how he could paint something like this without it breaking his heart. 

Maybe they say artists should create what they know, not because its unbelievable when they extend themselves beyond their experiences, but because when they pull it off with such elegance, it’s so damn unbearable to look at. I hate thinking of Lautrec, wondering about the lovers he created and knowing it was beyond his experience. Creating something that he knows is beautiful and knows he’ll never really understand. 

(via avobabe)

Anonymous asked: What's your opinion when people get angry at guys who say "not all men" and blame then for rape culture? I'm a women and a feminist and it bothers me so much. It is literally just like any other stereotype and men have a right to feel hurt if they are clumped into one group? They shouldn't excuse the issue because they don't cause it directly, but it is totally true that "not all men rape". Just like "not all Muslims are terrorists" it's the same deal. What do you think?

fuck-yeah-feminist:

For starters, that’s a false analogy. It’s not “the same deal” at all.

Muslims are a minority group in this country. They face huge amounts of prejudice, and are stereotyped for something that is completely inaccurate. “Terrorism” is a racialized term, and white men commit far more violent acts each year in America than Muslims of all races and genders combined.

Men, on the other hand, are NOT a minority group in this country. They do NOT face vast prejudices, and statistically speaking, they DO commit the vast majority of rapes.

———

Of course, we know that not all men are rapists. Obviously. However, all of them unavoidably exist in a system (rape culture) that privileges them, makes excuses for their actions, and blames victims instead of calling out reality. Claiming “not all men” dismisses that fact.

And like you said, “They shouldn’t excuse the issue because they don’t cause it directly”… but that’s exactly what these comments do.

Consider the following male responses in a discussion of rape:

  • "But I’m a good guy! Not all men are rapists, you know. How dare you bunch me in with them.”
  • "I agree. Since the vast majority of rapes are perpetrated by men, we should talk about why we teach that rape is an acceptable part of masculinity. I know that being male doesn’t make me a rapist, but other guys need to understand that our sexuality is in control as well."
  • "Male entitlement has gone too far. It’s tough, but I always try to call it out when I see it amongst my friends."

Which ones are helpful?


[Also, thanks for asking the question. It’s an important one.]